A New Report on the State of Craft Beer Shows Vermont Leading the Way

C + R Research has just released a new report on the craft beer industry. It contains a number of insights:

  • Vermont has the most number of breweries per capita
  • And Vermont also produces the most pints per capita
  • To no surprise to anyone that follows this industry, the number of craft breweries continues to show a steady upward trend
  • And the states seeing the most growth are New Jersey and Kentucky

But I think the most striking figure in this report is the economic impact:

Per capita for 21+ adults, Colorado comes in at No. 1 with an economic impact of $764 per person and Vermont at No. 2 with an economic impact of $681 per person. These numbers represent the overall output of the craft beer industry in each state based on the 21+ population.

via Vermont heads up the field in craft beer | Vermont Business Magazine

“There’s no good name for this phenomenon of a middle class imploding while economies nominally ‘grow.'”

Good read on business’ responsibility to create work, not just profit, in order to prevent future Brexits:

To prevent such catastrophes from happening, business needs to play a more active, engaged role in creating the kind of thriving, vibrant economies that inoculate societies from self-implosion—because those implosions take businesses down with them, too. Brexits don’t happen in thriving economies; they only happen when the pie is shrinking. People who have good jobs — jobs that allow them to do something useful, that pay livable wages, that come with good benefits — who can educate their children, get the health care they need, and live lives that are decent and whole generally don’t blow up their own economies in a misguided bid for attention, justice, and vengeance.

Source: Business Leaders Have Abandoned the Middle Class

“while closing the gate can ensure stability and the status quo (for now), it rarely leads to growth”

Some great questions to ponder for your organization or business:

  • Do outsiders get the benefit of the doubt?
  • Do we make it easy for outsiders to become insiders?
  • Is there a clear and well-lit path to do so?
  • When we tell someone new, “that not how we do things around here,” do we also encourage them to learn the other way and to try again?
  • Are we even capable of explaining the status quo, or is the way we do things set merely because we forgot that we could do it better?
  • Is a day without emotional or organizational growth a good day?

Source: Seth’s Blog: Closing the gate