“I’m not particularly interested in punk rock as a sound…but what I think is enduringly interesting and valuable is punk thought”

A good reminder from Jason Farrell:

The Dischord work ethic is very similar to skateboarding when I came to know it. If you wanted to ride something, you had to build it. So you had to learn how to build. A ton of enthusiasm, coupled with a crude understanding of hammer, nails, and wood gleaned from building tree forts would be the basis for a series of horrible ramps. But each one got a little better. Eventually, you’re good enough to build a house. It’s the same with music: it’s borrowed instruments plus a little talent, and bash it out until your skills catch up with your enthusiasm. I still live by that way of thinking: Don’t let not knowing how to do something stop you from doing something. Just get started—figure it out.

Source: Dischord Records: A Roundtable « Bandcamp Daily

Entrepreneurism: “what Americans are doing for themselves in communities across the country”

This…this gives me hope…

At a time when policy consensus at the federal level seems impossible, a grassroots movement is sweeping the nation and kindling a radical transformation in how Americans grow their local economies. Cities, communities and regions are building “ecosystems” of entrepreneurial innovation to generate new businesses and jobs that America needs. It’s no longer enough to recruit businesses from other regions in a perpetual zero-sum game. Nor is it enough to construct buildings, infrastructure, airport terminals or other projects that require heavy subsidies. Instead, we’re witnessing the birth of a new model of economic development — one based on collaboration among entrepreneurs and innovators that elevates culture as a driver of economic growth.

These ecosystems are not only located in the coastal states most readily associated with innovative economies, they are emanating from the center of America. Midwestern cities like St. Louis are offering both hope and optimism for renewed economic growth. With the presidential race providing seemingly no new solutions, Americans should support and expand this movement, for it provides the best hope of revitalizing economies throughout the nation

Source: Communities Across America Are Harnessing Entrepreneurism to Drive Growth

“What it meant to be part of a community with common goals of which mutual aid and support were not the least”

This will bend your brain, but is so interesting:

The wellbeing ideology is a symptom of a broader political disease. The rigors of both work and worklessness, the colonization of every public space by private money, the precarity of daily living, and the growing impossibility of building any sort of community maroon each of us in our lonely struggle to survive. We are supposed to believe that we can only work to improve our lives on that same individual level. Chris Maisano concludes that while “the appeal of individualistic and therapeutic approaches to the problems of our time is not difficult to apprehend . . . it is only through the creation of solidarities that rebuild confidence in our collective capacity to change the world that their grip can be broken.

”The isolating ideology of wellness works against this sort of social change in two important ways. First, it persuades all us that if we are sick, sad, and exhausted, the problem isn’t one of economics. There is no structural imbalance, according to this view—there is only individual maladaption, requiring an individual response. The lexis of abuse and gas-lighting is appropriate here: if you are miserable or angry because your life is a constant struggle against privation or prejudice, the problem is always and only with you. Society is not mad, or messed up: you are.

Secondly, it prevents us from even considering a broader, more collective reaction to the crises of work, poverty, and injustice.

Source: Laurie Penny | Life-Hacks of the Poor and Aimless

“To your highest purpose and best self friends”

It take[s] a lot of courage to speak your truth and use it to rise above tragedy and injustice. It takes a lot of courage to use that truth to forge your own path to independence based on your true character. Your willingness or failure to do so will, however, not stop life from throwing the ‘opportunities’ for you to you; over and over again. So why not use them for a higher purpose?

Why not make your legacy, in part, that you broke the mold in your family. You were the one able to create opportunities for others; you were the one able to create jobs; you were the one able to care for your family and the children of your children; you were the one able to to be the shining example in your community that others wants to emulate. We all want to be a part of history and through seeking and finding your own liberty we all can.

via What will be in your declaration of independence? | Entrepreneur the Arts

“We don’t need to be in our silos fighting for justice”

Some interesting lessons and reminders about

  • managing quick growth
  • investing in your community
  • taking the long view

from the Black Lives Matter movement in this Fast Company article.

“Our leadership is the people on the ground,” Tometi says. “We looked back at our history books and looked to our elders who shared with us lessons about what happens to organizations when all the decisions are made by one or two or three people. If something happens to them, the organization is defunct.”

To “nurture American creativity, to elevate the nation’s culture, and to sustain and preserve the country’s many artistic traditions”

The current state of the arts in this country is a microcosm of the state of the nation. Large, mainstream arts institutions, founded to serve the public good and assigned non-profit status to do so, have come to resemble exclusive country clubs. Meanwhile, outside their walls, a dynamic new generation of artists, and the diverse communities where they live and work, are being systematically denied access to resources and cultural legitimation.

Source: The National Endowment for the Arts at 50: Is the Future of Arts Funding a Positive One? – The Atlantic