“Innovation and entrepreneurship are the necessary ingredients for any economy or market to flourish”

From the Efosa Ojomo of Harvard Business Review, six of the signs you’re living in an entrepreneurial society:

  1. Innovation precedes regulation, not the other way around.
  2. Entrepreneurs and innovators are richly rewarded for their breakthroughs.
  3. The government depends on the ingenuity of the innovators.
  4. Innovations are pulled into – not pushed onto — society.
  5. Work is becoming more modularized.
  6. The society is either prosperous or is on a clear path toward prosperity. 

Source: 6 Signs You’re Living in an Entrepreneurial Society

What Can We Learn from Nashville about Building and Supporting a Music Community?

Looking forward to reading a new book, Beyond the Beat: Musicians Building Community in Nashville, which:

identifies the rise of three new types of musicians, or “artist activists,” who take a more active role in shaping their careers and communities: “enterprising artists” who are entrepreneurial and career-focused, “artistic social entrepreneurs” who combine music with a social mission to build community or maintain social spaces, and “artist advocates” who are remaking unionism for music and the arts (a few of whom are chronicled in the book). These three types of artist activists not only work to develop their own careers, but to support and help one another. In turn, they have created an inclusive peer community, strengthened the broader network of musicians, and bolstered the very fiber of Nashville and its music scene.

Also interested in reading about what the city of Nashville has done to support music:

Local public policy has sustained musicians and the industry in several ways. On the demand side, economic development has focused on music-themed tourism, museums, and festivals that attract consumers of music and related retail and hospitality services. On the supply side, the city has encouraged the development of affordable housing for musicians and other artists, as well as arts districts that provide studio, performance, and display spaces for performing and visual artists, and their fans.

Source: What Drives Nashville’s Music Industry – CityLab